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Event

7th - 9th August 2018

RoboVis 2018

Overview


RoboVis 2018

Canberra, 7th – 9th August 2018

RoboVis is our Centre’s annual science symposium covering the latest research in Robotic Vision.

This year RoboVis will be hosted by the Centre’s ANU node and will be held of 3 days at Canberra Rex Hotel, Canberra from Tuesday, 7th – Thursday, 9th August 2018.

The symposium consists of a program of guest speakers, research program presentations, technical demonstrations, 3 minute PhD spotlight session, and poster session, as well as activities including a debate in the original House of Representatives chamber at Old Parliament House.  Members from our Centre Advisory Board Committee will be joining us for the symposium.  RoboVis concludes with a day of knowledge training for all Centre PhD students and Research Fellows.

RoboVis in an annual showcase and celebration of the Centre’s research and achievements with all Centre Chief Investigators, Associate Investigators, Research Affiliates, Research Fellows, PhD students and Operations Team staff attending.

Registrations are now closed.

 

Program


Monday 6th August

Time

Venue

Description

From 2.00pm

Canberra Rex Hotel

Flights to Canberra and Check-In

Tuesday 7th August

Time

Venue

Description

6:00am onwards

Flights to Canberra

7.00am

Canberra Rex Hotel, Presidential Suite, Room 401

Centre Advisory Board Meeting

7.00am

Canberra Rex Hotel, Ballroom 1

Poster Setup

7.30am

Canberra Rex Hotel, Ballroom 1

Registration Opens

9:00am

Canberra Rex Hotel, Ballroom 1

Welcome - Ian Reid

9.30am

Canberra Rex Hotel, Ballroom 1

Technical Talk A - Ravi Garg

10.00am

Canberra Rex Hotel, Ballroom 1

Technical Talk B - Hongdong Li

10:30am

Canberra Rex Hotel, Ballroom 1

MORNING TEA

11:00

Canberra Rex Hotel, Ballroom 1

Elevator Pitch Presentations - Coordinator: Juxi Leitner

12.00pm

Canberra Rex Hotel, Ballroom 1

Road Map Presentation - Sue Keay

12.30pm

Canberra Rex Hotel, Ballroom 1

LUNCH

2.00pm

Canberra Rex Hotel, Ballroom 1

Spotlight Talk - Tom Drummond, SLAM Learning

3.00pm

Canberra Rex Hotel, Ballroom 1

Future Perspective Talk A - Kylie Ahern, STEM Matters

3.30pm

Canberra Rex Hotel, Ballroom 3-5

AFTERNOON TEA & Poster Session 1 - Coordinator: Yasir Latif

5.00pm

Canberra Rex Hotel, Ballroom 1

Guest Speaker - Professor Genevieve Bell

6.00pm

Canberra Rex Hotel

Drinks & Dinner

Wednesday 8th August

Time

Venue

Description

7.30am

Canberra Rex Hotel, Presidential Suite 401

RVSS 2019 Meeting

7.30am

Canberra Rex Hotel, Ballroom 1

Demo and Poster Setup

9.30am

Canberra Rex Hotel, Ballroom 1

Guest Speaker - Professor Brian Schmidt, ANU Vice Chancellor and Professor Elanor Huntington, Dean, College of Engineering and Computer Science, "Diversity in STEM"

10.30am

Canberra Rex Hotel, Ballroom 3-5

MORNING TEA & Poster Session 2

12.00pm

Canberra Rex Hotel, Ballroom 1

Future Perspective Talk B - Anton van den Hengel, AIML

12.30pm

Canberra Rex Hotel, Ballroom 1

LUNCH

2.00pm

Canberra Rex Hotel, Ballroom 1

Technical Talk C - Valerio Ortenzi

2,30pm

Canberra Rex Hotel, Ballroom 1

Technical Talk D - Miaomiao Liu

3.00pm

Canberra Rex Hotel, Ballroom 1

Future Perspective Talk C - Stephen Gould

3.30pm

Canberra Rex Hotel, Ballroom 1

AFTERNOON TEA & Demos - Coordinator: Viorela Ila

5.00pm

FREE TIME

5.30pm

Old Parliament House - via Bus Transfer

Debate & Cocktail Dinner at Old Parliament House

Thursday 9th August

Time

Venue

Description

8.30am

Canberra Rex Hotel, Ballroom 1

Demonstrator Project Meetings

9.30am

Canberra Rex Hotel, Ballroom 1

Science Project Meetings

10.30am

Canberra Rex Hotel, Ballroom 1

MORNING TEA

11.00am

Canberra Rex Hotel, Ballroom 1

Technical Talk E - Niko Suenderhauf & Juxi Leitner

11.30pm

Canberra Rex Hotel, Ballroom 1

Town Hall Meeting - Q&A Centre Legacy - Ian Reid

12.00pm

Canberra Rex Hotel, Ballroom 1

Summary & Close - Ian Reid

12.30pm

Canberra Rex Hotel, Ballroom 1

LUNCH

2.00pm

Canberra Rex Hotel, Ballroom 1

Student & Research Fellow Training

PhD Researcher Session

Research Fellow Session

2:10pm-2:30pm

Developing your Career - Sue Keay

Engaging with Industry - Anton van den Hengel

2:30pm-2:50pm

Managing Time - Niko Sunderhauf

Grant Writing - Gustavo Carneiro

2:50pm-3:10pm

Engaging with Industry - Anton van den Hengel

Developing your Career - Sue Keay

3:10pm-3:30pm

Everyone has a story - Shelley Thomas

Managing Time - Niko Sunderhauf

3.30pm-4:00pm

Canberra Rex Hotel, Ballroom 1

AFTERNOON TEA

4:00pm-4:20pm

Grant Writing - Gustavo Carneiro

What's a "good" problem? - Rob Mahony

4:20pm-4:50pm

Managing People - Steve Gould

Everyone has a story - Shelley Thomas

4:50pm-5:20pm

What's a "good" problem? - Rob Mahony

Managing People - Steve Gould

5:20pm-5:30pm

Question Time

Question Time

5:30pm

CLOSE

CLOSE

5.30pm

FREE TIME

FREE TIME

6.15pm

Debacle, Mode 3, 24 Lonsdale Street, Braddon

Dinner for Research Fellows - Please meet in the Foyer at 6.15pm to walk 15 minutes to Braddon

6.15pm

Kokomo, 1 Genge Street, Canberra

Dinner for Students - Please meet in the Foyer at 6.15pm to walk 15 minutes to the city

Friday 10th August

Time

Venue

Description

By 10:00am

Canberra Rex Hotel

Check-Out time for Students & Research Fellows

Speakers


Professor Brian P. Schmidt AC FAA FRS

Professor Brian P. Schmidt AC FAA FRS

Vice-Chancellor and President, The Australian National University, 2011 Nobel Laureate Physics

Diversity in STEM

Abstract: The ANU is committed to growing the profile of Science and Technology in the community and attracting more young women to take up careers in STEM related fields. Tech development is not just a numbers game anymore. Creative thinkers who can come up with unique solutions when problems come up need to be part of high tech. Systemic and cultural factors either prevent or encourage young women to become involved in study and work in these fields. We are on a mission to encourage young women to get involved in sciences and maths.

Professor Brian P. Schmidt was appointed Vice-Chancellor and President of The Australian National University (ANU) in January 2016.
Professor Schmidt is the 12th Vice-Chancellor of The Australian National University (ANU). Winner of the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics, Professor Schmidt was an astrophysicist at the ANU Mount Stromlo Observatory and Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics before becoming Vice-Chancellor.
Professor Schmidt received undergraduate degrees in Astronomy and Physics from the University of Arizona in 1989, and completed his Astronomy Master’s degree (1992) and PhD (1993) from Harvard University. Under his leadership, in 1998, the High-Z Supernova Search team made the startling discovery that the expansion rate of the Universe is accelerating. Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science, The United States Academy of Science, and the Royal Society, he was made a Companion of the Order of Australia in 2013.

 

Professor Elanor Huntington

Professor Elanor Huntington

Dean, ANU College of Engineering & Computer Science, The Australian National University

Diversity in STEM

Professor Huntington became the first female Dean of Engineering and Computer Science at the Australian National University when she was appointed in June 2014.

Professor Huntington is committed to growing the profile of Engineering in the community and is passionate about attracting more young women to take up careers in STEM related fields.

Professor Huntington has previously held the position of the Head of School of Engineering and Information Technology with UNSW Canberra at the Australian Defence Force Academy.

Professor Huntington holds a PhD in experimental quantum optics from the ANU.  From early 1999, she spent 18 months at the Defence Science and Technology Organisation working in science policy.  Professor Huntington’s current research interests are in the control of quantum systems, with particular interest in the interface between theory and applications.  Professor Huntington is also a program manager in the ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology.

 

Professor Genevieve Bell

Professor Genevieve Bell

Director, 3A Institute, The Australian National University, and Senior Fellow, Intel

The Prehistory of Robots

Abstract:  As human beings, we have always been fascinated with making life, in its many forms, with all of the technologies of the day at our disposals. Our cultures and our histories are steeped in stories of making life: gods making human beings to do their biddings; gods making themselves into human beings temporarily; ancestral figures transforming themselves into human beings; strange hybrids of gods and human beings with blends of skills and powers. When the word and idea of robots first appeared in English, we had already built mechanical objects (and indeed mechanical people), and we had imagined making life. Robots had an immediate and global resonance in no small part because it became the place where centuries of literary and technical activities collided. But what it does it really mean to have technologies that could be like humans. In this talk, Prof Genevieve Bell traces the history of automata, monsters, and mechanical men as precursors to robots, and how we might locate robots in this larger set of cultural and historical conversations. Bell explores the line between what has sensations and what doesn’t, and the implication that has for notions of life, consciousness and intelligence. Drawing on cultural, literary, and historical accounts, Bell makes the case that we have an opportunity to re-imagine how we encounter robots and make sense of new digital technologies.

Bio: Professor Bell is the Director of the 3A Institute, Florence Violet McKenzie Chair and a Distinguished Professor at the Australian National University (ANU) as well as Vice President and Senior Fellow at Intel Corporation.  Prof Bell is a cultural anthropologist, technologist and futurist best known for her work at the intersections of cultural practice and technology development.

Prof Bell joined the ANU’s College of Engineering and Computer Science in February 2017, after having spent the past 18 years in Silicon Valley helping guide Intel’s product development by developing the company’s social science and design research capabilities.

Prof Bell now heads the newly established Autonomy, Agency and Assurance (3A) Institute launched in September 2017 by the ANU in collaboration with CSIRO’s Data61, in building a new applied science around the management of artificial intelligence, data technology and their impact on humanity.

Prof Bell is the inaugural appointee to the Florence Violent McKenzie Chair at the ANU, named in honour of Australia’s first female electrical engineer, which promotes the inclusive use of technology in society.

Tom Drummond

Tom Drummond

Chief Investigator

The Importance of Uncertainty in Machine Learning

Abstract:  In addition to things we know, there are (to paraphrase Donald Rumsfeld) known unknowns (things we know we don’t know) and unknown unknowns (things we aren’t even aware of).  This holds in machine learning also and it is important for robust behaviour that these effects be modelled so that AI systems can avoid problems in uncertain situations.  This talk will present two methods developed in our lab of modelling uncertainty that enable robotic systems to operate in unstructured open world environments.

Kylie Ahern

Kylie Ahern

STEM Matters

Rethinking engagement in a time of technology disruption: The opportunity for universities and researchers to engage Australians
directly with their research and research impact.

Abstract; Competition for research grants, philanthropic funds, industry collaborations, students and academics continues to grow.  Universities and research institutes are expected to engage across all sectors of society – government, public, media and industry – as well as demonstrate their impact, value and collaborations.
With more than 3 billion people online and 2 billion people on social media, there has been a radical shift in how people search for and
share information. Although media is still important in establishing credibility, it is no longer a powerful distribution point and cannot match the scale and targeting of digital media. These trends present an opportunity for organisations – become the destination point around your research and teaching strengths and build your own audience.
The public primarily see universities through the prism of teaching and they don’t understand the value of research to their everyday lives,
not just health. This can be completely changed by how universities communicate and engage, but universities and research institutes are still very PR focused and do not understand the difference between PR-based content and audience-focused content. They are missing out on the opportunity that technology disruption has brought to them to connect with Australians and build audience and trust in the same way that media.
This talk will discuss the opportunity to connect the public with the value of research in Australia for ensure continued government funding, industry connections, industry demand for PHD students, public awareness and student recruitment.

Bio: Kylie is an award-winning science publisher and entrepreneur with experience that spans media, telecommunications, science and education.

In 2004 Kylie co-founded Cosmos Media and launched Australia’s top-selling science magazine, Cosmos. The company was recognised through 54 awards and commendations for the high quality of its publications, websites, science outreach programs, publishing and journalism.Kylie created educational products – teachers notes, study guides, posters, career guides – to which 70% of Australia’s high schools and hundreds of overseas subscribed to reach more than 130,000 students. She transitioned the business from print to multiple media platforms with Apple naming it among its ‘Best of 2012’ app launches.

Since selling Cosmos Media in 2013, she has been consulting for various organisations. She helped set up the Nature Publishing Group in Australia, conceived of the Queensland Brain Institute’s Brain series and in 2016 founded STEM Matters, a strategy, communications and content agency. Clients include Westpac, the Federal Government and universities and research institutes across Australia.

Stephen Gould

Stephen Gould

Chief Investigator

“When you come to a fork in the road…”

Abstract: As researchers, and more generally technologists, our career is paved with many exciting projects and opportunities that we need to choose between. My own career path has meandered through start-ups, academia and industry, each with its unique set of challenges and rewards. Recently I was presented with the opportunity to lead a research team at Amazon. As the great Yogi Berra once said, “when you come to a fork in the road, take it!” This talk reflects on my experience at Amazon, differences between academic and industry research, and lessons learned.

Valerio Ortenzi

Valerio Ortenzi

Research Fellow

Handovers and the choice of grasps

Abstract: Object handover is an example of joint action which involves one agent, passer, transferring an object to a partner, receiver. The implementation of an effective and natural-feeling human-robot handover is an unconquered challenge. Despite seeming a simple action, human-human handover is an effort of inference and adjustment from both partners. This talk will thus review human grasping before diving into the findings of our experiment on human-human handovers. The factors that play a key role in grasping and in handovers will be analysed critically and directions of future work will highlight how handovers represent an open research problem.

Registration


Registrations close Friday 6th July 2018. You can register at: https://consec.eventsair.com/robovis-2018/register

For any questions related to RoboVis 2018, contact Carol directly.

Venue & Logistics


RoboVis 2018

RoboVis is our Centre’s annual science symposium covering the latest research in Robotic Vision.  This year RoboVis 2018 will be hosted by our ANU node and held over 3 days at the Canberra Rex Hotel. It will be held from Tuesday 7th August to Thursday 9th August 2018.  To register please follow the link here.

To get there it’s a short transfer from Canberra airport to the Canberra Rex Hotel..

This year’s program is a mixture of guest speakers, technical talks, future perspective talks, training, and social events, including a debate & cocktail dinner at Old Parliament House.

The program and details of the event is available on the website here. The symposium is open to all Centre Researchers and Staff. All travel costs are covered by the Centre.

Travelling to Canberra

Our full program kicks off on Tuesday 7th August. Please note – there is always the risk of morning fog in Canberra.  We recommend that travellers from QUT, Adelaide and Monash travel down on Monday 6th afternoon/evening to avoid potential flight delays.  If you would prefer to travel down on the Monday afternoon/evening, please notify Carol Taylor via: carol.taylor@anu.edu.au or the conference organiser Consec via: robovis@consec.com.au to arrange an extra night of accommodation.

Early Career Researchers

Research Training is scheduled for the afternoon on Thursday 9th August in two parallel sessions – one for Research Fellows & one for PhD Researchers. It will be run by our Chief Investigators who will present on different topics and conclude with separate dinners out in Canberra.

Please note it is compulsory for all RFs & PhD researchers to attend this training. You will have accommodation for Thursday night and then check out and travel home on Friday morning.

Get involved

This year we have Elevator Pitch Presentations (3MT), Poster Sessions & Demo Sessions. It is an expectation that all students who have been with us longer than 6 months will present a poster.  If you haven’t ready done an Elevator Pitch at an previous RoboVis we recommend you presenting one this year.

Travel arrangements 

Adelaide & Monash researchers should contact Thuy Mai (Adelaide) & Sandra Pedersen (Monash) who will be able to assist with your flight bookings for the symposium.  Please specify if you would like to travel Monday evening or Tuesday morning.

QUT researchers need to book their flights through the online QUT Corporate Travel Management (CTM) system.

Questions about RoboVis 2018?

Please contact Carol Taylor directly via carol.taylor@anu.edu.au

RoboVis is an annual showcase and celebration of the Centre’s research and I look forward to seeing you in Canberra!

Elevator Pitch/Demos/Poster


There are a number of ways you can showcase your research to the rest of the Centre during the event.  Register your interest in participating in 1 or more of these events by contacting the relevant coordinator directly by Sunday 1st July 2018 and indicating your interest on your registration form.

Elevator Pitch Presentations (3MT)
This year the competition will be coordinated by QUT Research Fellow, Juxi Leitner.  Guidelines for the competition can be found here
PowerPoint Slide Template for your presentation are here
If you have any questions please contact Juxi directly.

Demo Sessions
ANU Research Fellow Viorela Ila will coordinate this year’s demo sessions.  The guidelines can be found here
Poster Template here
If you have any questions please contact Viorela directly.

Research Poster Session
Research Fellow Yasir Latif will coordinate the poster session.  The research poster session will allow all students to present 1 poster and give a quick presentation. Guidelines are available here .  If you have any questions please contact Yasir directly.
Poster Template here

Awards for the best Elevator Pitch, Demo and Research Poster will be presented on the evening of Wednesday, 8 August 2018.

For further information please contact Carol Taylor.

Contacts


Rob Mahony

Rob Mahony

ANU Node Leader and Chief Investigator, Vision & Action Program Leader

Rob Mahony is a Professor in the Research School of Engineering at the Australian National University and has been a Chief Investigator with the Centre since its inauguration in 2014. His research interests are in non-linear systems theory with applications in robotics and computer vision.

He wrote the seminal paper providing a clear exposition of non-linear complementary filters on the special orthogonal group for attitude estimation; an enabling technology in the early development of quadrotor aerial robotic vehicles.  He was the first to provide a principled analysis for using optical flow of control of aerial robotic vehicles and was a coauthor on the first experimental paper that demonstrated landing of a quadrotor vehicle on a textured but featureless moving surface.

In 2016, Rob was named a Fellow of the IEEE, recognising his contribution to the control aspects of aerial robotics.

Carol Taylor

Carol Taylor

ANU Node Administration Officer

For any questions related to RoboVis 2018, contact Carol directly.

Australian Centre for Robotic Vision
2 George Street Brisbane, 4001
+61 7 3138 7549